walking tour Archive

Machu Picchu’s Story in Stone

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP Disclosure: This post may contain Affiliate Links. Sitting in the Vilcabamba mountain range of Peru, perched high above the Vilcanota River, is a sacred place. They call it Machu Picchu. Viewed from above it looks like a great bird – like a condor –  turning in full flight. Up close, it

The Wild Side of Machu Picchu

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP Disclosure: This post may contain Affiliate Links. Machu Picchu – architectural wonder, Inca monument, historic gem. All are fitting descriptions for this fortress carved of stone, but I’m going to detour for a moment and take you along for a walk on Machu Picchu’s wild side. Discovering Machu Picchu’s Wild Things

All Aboard for Lizard Land in the Galapagos

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP Disclosure: This post may contain Affiliate Links. A ship, a ship – we have a ship. The Monserrat waits patiently in the harbour for us to board. Our Galapagos boat adventure is about to begin. It’s all aboard for lizard land. The Galapagos Name Game Okay, maybe lizard land isn’t the

Barkerville, B.C. – A Grave History

Written by: Megan Kopp At its peak in the 1860s, the gold mining town of Barkerville, B.C. was the biggest thing west of Chicago and north of San Francisco. The ghost town today sees a mere fraction of the number of people that once clomped along the wooden sidewalks off Williams Creek in the foothills

What a Rush: Barkerville, B.C.

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP Most people have heard of the California ‘49ers. Many know of the Klondike stampeders heading up to the Yukon in 1898. But what about the gold fever surrounding Barkerville, British Columbia? It lies smack dab in the middle of the western gold rush timeline. Connecting to the Past I have three

Towers and Forts: An Irish Treasure Hunt

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP We often travel a route with the map in hand and randomly choose short historic side trips to investigate while on the way to our actual destination. Sometimes, it’s a wild goose chase. Other times, it’s a treasure hunt that leads to such beauties as the Ring of Kerry’s Staigue Fort

Ireland’s Skellig Michael: A Storied Past

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP Somewhere between the 6th and 8th centuries, a group of monks sought an isolated locale to practice their religion. They found Skellig Michael. Skellig come from Sceillic, which means steep rock. Over the next 500 years these Christian monks would develop a precipitous monastic complex that boggles the mind. Perched on a

Ireland’s Trim Castle

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP Trim – the word sounds precise, with little excess. Trim Castle – on the River Boyne – is just the opposite. It is the largest Normandy castle in Ireland. Historic stone structures always draw my attention and Trim was no exception. We had to stop and take a look. Arriving too late in the

Getting to Know Guinness: Going to the Source in Dublin, Ireland

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP You can’t go to Dublin and not have a pint of Guinness. It would be like going to Italy and not eating pasta or visiting California’s Napa Valley and not having a sip of wine. St. Jame’s Gate I decided my first taste of the dark brew should be as close to the

The Stone Circles of Cork & Kerry, Ireland

WRITTEN BY: MEGAN KOPP Think Celtic stone circle and what comes to mind? Most likely it’s Stonehenge – the granddaddy of all stone circles. Rings of standing stones are more common in the land of the Celts than you’d think. There are somewhere in the neighbourhood of 235 stone circles in Ireland. Almost half of these